7/10/2009

Rubs me Wrong

"Catch a rare glimpse of life as seen and experienced by a person on the autism spectrum. "

---From a Unique Perspective: Judy Endow Shares Her Experiences as an Individual on the Spectrum Through Her Book Paper Words: Discovering and Living with My Autism --- in an email I received from the Autism Asperger Publishing Company.

First off, my beef isn't with the work itself, the author, or the publishing house. It's with this one sentence used to promote the work. Are you kidding me? Where exactly is it rare to get a glimpse of what life is like from adults on the spectrum? Have they not seen the hundreds of blogs by adults on the spectrum? And what, are they now rare and exotic creatures who are hidden away and untouchable and unreachable?

This really rubs me wrong. Not a necessary sentence at all.

Her story is valuable whether it is rare or not. And it's not rare.

aapc@asperger.net is the publishing house's email. Tell 'em you don't appreciate the wording. That sentence is unnecessary.


Here's the email itself:


"From a Unique Perspective: Judy Endow Shares Her Experiences as an Individual on the Spectrum Through Her Book Paper Words: Discovering and Living with My Autism

Paper Words: Discovering and Living with My Autism by Judy Endow, MSW
Catch a rare glimpse of life as seen and experienced by a person on the autism spectrum. In this intensely personal book, readers are swept up into a fast-paced journey of how Judy Endow noticed her differences early on, how she eventually discovered her autism, and how she embraces life autistically.
From her troubled teenage years in a state institution where her coping behaviors were interpreted as defiant and oppositional, to her years in a Christian community, where once again her behaviors were misunderstood, to a brief marriage and the birth of her three sons, Judy has emerged as a strong voice on the autism spectrum.
Beyond presenting a fascinating journey of resilience, courage, hard work, and sheer will power,
Paper Words shows visually on the printed page how Judy, a highly visual thinker, translates her thoughts into words."


And you can let me know if you think I'm nitpicking on this one in the comments. :-)

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