6/03/2009

Autism and death: not really "being that different"

"Maybe my child didn't Die Physically....But the boy that I gave birth too, is no longer here. The Ghost of Autism, has now taken his place. He went from a child who could talk, to a person who cant. A child that made eye contact and interacted in his world...to a child that has had to be taught to make eye contact and has to learn how to interact in this world..So you see...I don't really see the two as being that different...and others, including you may disagree with me... and That's OK, because I know you're not walking in my shoes or my son's shoes.BTW, I never said that the Swine Flu wasn't important....it is. However, I believe the autism epidemic, is just as important."

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-kirby/notes-from-the-big-anti-v_b_209506.html?show_comment_id=25130696#comment_25130696

This person just wrote that she didn't see physical death and autism as "being that different," didn't she? That's what I read, right?

2 comments:

Gonzo said...

Wow, I gotta ask my mum, if she thinks I'm dead and a ghost, because I don't "interact" in this world as is typical.
(And it's quite telling, that this woman confuses "this world" with the *people* in this world.)
Also this eye contact as proof of humanity- what gives?

KWombles said...

Imagine her child someday reading those words? Gonna be a stormy relationship, I have to figure. My two oldest can and do read what I write, and I deal matter of factly in explaining that their brains are wired differently. It's no big deal in our home. We all have our issues. Maybe if more people got that and were accepting of other people's issues it would be a nicer place. :-)

I don't get the eye contact bit, either. I work with my three to make eye contact when they greet others, to work at holding it for as long as is comfortable, but I get that the reasons for not looking directly at people are reasonable and valid for them. My goal for my three children is to ease their forays into the neurotypical world, to help neurotpyicals understand some of the ways people on the spectrum see the world differently, and to promote tolerance and acceptance. If sustained eye contact is overstimulating, then neurotypicals need to understand that and make some accomodations. Not think the individual is a shadow, soulless or a ghost.